Our seventh Webcast where Sarah will be discussing the Hair & Makeup role with three veteran HMU artists.

Discussion Topics:

  • Advice on starting the journey
  • Being on set vs off set.
  • Useful tips and tools
  • Fun and challenging projects from previous work

 

Sarah Marince – https://www.shoots.video/listing/sara…

Durand Carter – https://www.instagram.com/durandcarter

Cris Michelle – https://www.shoots.video/listing/dall…

Melissa Oretta – https://www.shoots.video/listing/sacr…

 

Sarah Marince:

Hi everyone happy Wednesday. And welcome to another episode of crew talk, hosted by cutes.video. And today we have a very cool topic when I’m super pumped about it’s hair and makeup. I did my hair. I tried to do my hair all nice and fancy because I’d have some some panelists here who might be judging how I did my hair and makeup extra time on it tonight. So hello to my three panelists today is very good to have you with us. And I hope you’re ready to dive into the world of hair and makeup and how this is going to work. I have some questions here that I am ready to ask you. And as we get going our attendees, if they have any questions, they are going to drop it into the chat box and we will get to those toward the end of this video. So I guess we’ll just dive into it. And I think we’re going to go on a rotation today with some of the questions, but let’s get started. And this question, I’m just going to go ahead. What made you take a leap of faith and hop into the makeup where all the hair and makeup world and Duran, I think we’re starting with you.

Durand Carter:

Hi everybody. My name’s Durand Carter. I actually, I have a pretty profound answer to that and it’s basically my leap of faith was that I stopped fighting it. Like any of us growing up, I had a parent one who was in construction, a mom who was an educator, so was gung ho for school. And my leap of faith moment was what I find, not found or discovered, or even embraced the fact that I had this talent, this talent and this ability to connect with people and to also help them discover what it is that they were looking for. And a lot of the times that was in beauty and the aesthetic world. So that was my leap of faith moment. And then you pair that with creative competence and the ability to kind of really, I have to educate myself in the industry, of course, but that moment of letting go and trusting that ability to within myself, I guess you’d say was when I started really like finding my, my, my place, my fit.

Durand Carter:

And and that was in the beauty and the makeup world started with a little hair, started with a little baby beauty. I’m sure all of us have tried makeup. I even tried it on myself. There was no beard man, but I, so I dabbled and played find out that this is what I was enjoying. And once I found the enjoyment in it it was pursue the career. So that’s what I got intellectually from the mom was like, Hey, if you do it, educate yourself that way you can do it and do it. Well, that’s my answer.

Sarah Marince:
Wonderful, wonderful, Melissa?

Melissa Oretta:

I love his answer and I feel like I actually relate to you on a couple of things. First. My mom’s a teacher too. So education was always something that was really pushed with me as well, but makeup, I do, I thrive off of the connection with the client. It’s really what kind of pulled me in, in the first place. That moment

Melissa Oretta:

Of like Durand said, giving them what they want and manifesting that for them on their body. And that moment that they look in the mirror to me, that is, I paid by that 10 times over, you know, I’ve always been somebody that’s been really creative and I like to create a story and make up something that really helps me to do that too. So it is making, it was just such a manifestation of being able to bring my

creativity in the world out. And yeah, if you’re passionate about it, then you educate yourself and build a career.

Cris Michelle:

I love that answer guys. I love it. So I would say what helped me or made me take that leap of faith was honestly the universe. So a lot of times I was kind of like fighting it. I wasn’t makeup when I was younger around 21 and then at 26 I had my first daughter and then I had my other daughter.

Cris Michelle:

I got pregnant again when I was my, she was three months pregnant. So in that time I pause on makeup and I tried the whole stay at home moms. I even got back into the service industry and it was just kind of like, I felt like I was just pushing against the ocean waves and then it just kind of clicked in my mind, just turn around and go with it. So I really felt like that passion in my heart to get back into the the industry of makeup and I freelanced for a little bit. And then I decided I didn’t want to sell makeup anymore. You know, where very rarely I actually did makeup were in, the more focus was selling makeup. And for me, there’s just such a serene peace when I’m able to glam clients and beyond photo shoots and music videos, it just like brings me such peace. So I honestly feel like what, what med led me to that place was the universe. So I’m very, very grateful.

Sarah Marince:

Lovely. So Duran, you mentioned education. And so in all three of you can touch on this. What did your education look like to get into hair and makeup?

Durand Carter:

Well, I kind of took a different route. I started out with my college career, which was nothing to do with makeup, but it was about business and, and this was going to apply later on because I wanted to get a business degree and in the struggle and finding that I looked into a number of makeup schools, I’m going to what, at that time it seemed to be a small town. It was just Fresno and the bigger makeup schools and places that I wanted to go to at that particular time, which is 20, 30 years ago, we’re in LA. And I was just like, Oh gosh, well, I guess I’m going to have to get there. So I did the pursuit to Los Angeles, looked into some makeup schools, which were very expensive on my meager earnings and work. And I realized that, okay, I started assisting and working in studios.

Durand Carter:

I had the opportunity to work with some great friends that owned either photography, studios that were other makeup artists and really Marvel at their works. And so I then had a couple of casting director being an assistant. We were doing photo shoots in these really tiny, small studios and everybody was trying to make it. So I then discovered that, okay, I got to get my college cosmetology license because that’s going to be at least something that’s going to secure me. And so I did that. I did cosmetology after having cosmetology, then my beauty, I thought, boy, I’m gonna make some money doing some hair. And suddenly my drawback to beauty came even more powerful. I at one point worked with Redkin and L’Oreal I went on tour with them. And that was gosh, I fight or flight.

Speaker 2:

I got to work with some brilliant artists that were also sharing their education and their knowledge helped to fine tune my words. Another was listening to I’ll make up artistry team. I traveled and toured

with them. And that gave me a bit of knowledge as well. No mindfully. That didn’t mean that I didn’t get any education. Those bars like certifications, if each step along the way, came with a certificate or a certification or or a, a branding from a brand line. There were numerous lines that I work within the department stores as well, that give you specific knowledge on their lines. And so that gives you a certificate. So all of these things compiled really became an educational Groupon, if you will. So it gave me a lot of knowledge in that sense,

Melissa Oretta:

I got my bachelor’s first to textile design and merchandising. So went that route. And the entire time I put myself through school by working at counter grew with a few different cosmetic brands that gave me a lot of education and training went back, got my Cosmo. And that, you know, we just do things backwards. It’s okay. And became a trainer for some brands as well. And so I did, I had a lot of out in the field on client learning. And then from there, same thing really assisted under some fantastic artists in the LA area and learned a ton and finally got to a place where I branched out on my own. And the thing I think about makeup is that you’re constantly learning and evolving with it. Education never stops as long as you let it continue to come. Technique is always evolving. Product is always evolving and what that lens to it. So I feel like, yeah, the education never ends, but that’s how I got there. What about you.

Cris Michelle:

I gained my various pieces of knowledge about makeup from YouTube and from a lot of like two groups, makeup groups. And then that’s honestly when it starts that passion in me, but then from there I learned through

Cris Michelle:

And Nordstrom’s, and as as I freelanced through different brands that’s where I gained different techniques. And just like you said, Melissa, you know, forever changing, you know, and so I gained knowledge, honestly, every aspect every, every set, you know what works, what doesn’t work, but a lot of it was just from YouTube to be quite honest with you. And then of course at counter

Sarah Marince:

Wonderful. So in the world of YouTube, you can find just about anything and a lot of it. I know if you go on my YouTube page, like the videos that are suggested, a lot of them are makeup tutorials and videos like that. So you can learn a lot, as you said, you can learn a lot. So for somebody who wants to get into it as a career in 2020 and moving forward, is it okay to just have your education come from learning via YouTube and things like that and, or do you have to have a license nowadays?

Durand Carter:

I’ll try me on that. A license isn’t necessarily to be a makeup artist, a certification or some sort of information that you have that kind of gives lens validity to your work will be helpful. It’s nice to have a certificate on the wall because that gives them some confidence to the clientele that you’re working with. But if you’re at counter, like I mentioned earlier, one of the brand lines will educate you on their specific brand. And that’s a really good foot in the door. I speak pretty frequently with students at a number of the beauty colleges that are going out or, and or that come to counter. I’ve had some wonderful people that just come in and want to know, Hey, how do I get into this industry? And so I of course want them to have some sense of job connection and understanding and skill because that first of all comes with the responsibility of being someone that can be there and reliable, right.

Durand Carter:

In order to hold the job. So they want to have that key piece in their belt and from there, the artistry aspect and the skillset and the, and the confidence and the comfortability of utilizing a brand line will come from a brand for stores. I also was on the archery team for Chanel. I’m a tenured management with the Chanel artistry team and a special lease group within their company. And I have to think back to when I, once dreamt of working for that brand and someone said, Hey, kid, I’ll give you a shot. And I said, okay, well, I’ll take it. Do you want in the arm or the butt? I was like, I’ll take this up, get it. Okay. There’s my humor. But anyways. But quite honestly, it’s it, you know, in the pursuit of the educational aspects of there’s some tremendous students that are out there that are showing the initiative and that can really help them get the foot in the door. I did. I answer that. Cause I mean, there were so many anchors.

Cris Michelle:

For sure. And I, I agree with you Duran. I personally think that it doesn’t matter where you go to school or what school you go to, what knowledge you gain. You can never teach or learn passion and confidence, and honestly just the courage to go out there and network. So those are things that you can’t teach. And for me although I don’t have a license or, or a degree in what I do, I have all of those things, you know, and there’s no fear within the employees doing this. Like I will take every single chance and shot. And that’s honestly where I got in my position now, where I’m the makeup artist at Fox for news in Dallas, just taking a leap of faith, you know, and letting the universe guide just kind of guide you through and just, you know, open these doors of opportunities that are there, that you just need to knock on or walk through.

Cris Michelle:

So I personally think knowledge is gained in different aspects, whether you go to school YouTube, but most importantly is having an open mind that no matter where you are in the makeup world, that you always have something to learn.

Melissa Oretta:

Yes. I totally agree with that. And touching people all the time and getting creative and experimenting and realizing makeup is not permanent. You could wash it off if you mess it up. So many things you’ve learned by just picking up your brush and trying it.

Sarah Marince:

So talking a little bit about your kids, how do you build your kids and what makes them unique and different with different types of products and things like that.

Durand Carter:

This is a very interesting one because in the experience of it all, there’s a, it depends on your niche. And and also knowing that, so if you’re going to show up, let’s say, for example, a wedding or bridal makeup, or just beauty makeup, then you’re going to need your beauty items in there. You’re going to need a little sparkle. You’re going to need to match what’s on trend. And you want to tailor your, your kit for that. I think at this point we’re probably all facing a little bit of that at this time, more than ever before because you’re going to need the tools in your kit to address whatever gig you’re on is what I like to say. So if you’re doing artistry for bridal, you want to have a kit that’s tailored for that, or it can be well rounded.

Speaker 2:

The other is that I have a specific kit for special effects. I absolutely love it. Do I get to go into that kid every day? No, it’s not something that I get to plan very often. However I do have that and it tailors to that specific that specific needs, so there may be a job or a gate that comes up that requires me to utilize those things. And then I’ll have that Kip tailor for that. Something on an international level I have was fortunate enough to travel to Europe for a a huge event. And of course with flight fees and bag weights and the whole works I had to tailor a kit that was just so specific to those needs and it took a little work on my end to, to get everything down to size, but it was, I was able to do that and still utilize all the things they are. And it’s really knowing what you have in order to address whatever the needs are going to be for the job. It’s pretty simple.

Melissa Oretta:

I think you nailed it. I think you totally nailed it. Knowing what you’re walking into, tailoring your kit to that utilizing products that are specific to the needs of that job and just knowing your tools before you go into making sure that you’re just familiar and that it’s stuff that you’re comfortable with working with.

Cris Michelle:

I agree. 100%. I definitely use you definitely want to gain, engage. What you’re going into with a gig is, and kind of like add or take out things you’re not overwhelming yourself by having to carry and educate around just unnecessary things. So definitely read, read the situation and add, or take out things that you may not need, but of course we always need like the fundamentals, you know, foundation powders, blushes, highlighters, you know, all that stuff, but adding like the extra touches or taking it out, you know, you may not need glitter liner today, you know, so definitely I, 100% agree with Duran and Melissa.

Sarah Marince:
So how have you created new sanitation methods for your kid and setbacks?

Durand Carter:

Aha. the sanitation methods as this is a really good one because there are also just to share with everyone out there. There’s something that’s really cool and it doesn’t take a cosmetologist to get this, but there’s a Barbicide certification as well as a beauty certification that is available, that is COVID compliant. I urge and encourage any of the artists or everyone in our industry to just look into it. It’s something that’s very simple. It does take some learning, some, you know, some skillset you want to read through it and basically ask the questions, but it educates you on the safety practices. Your client is your most important asset as well as protecting yourself. So that’s one thing that I would like to share with everybody as a gift of life that you can utilize. And at the end of that comes with a certificate.

Durand Carter:

The other is to put that into practice. It, it refreshes you if you will, on some of the common COVID practices for myself not only do I follow those guidelines, but also it’s wearing a space shield some services at counter, which is in the department stores or beauty service counters as well as salons. There’s a no charge service. So unfortunately for those makeup artists that that we just have the client who walks up and wants to try the lipstick or wants to try the foundation, it’s not happening in the retail world, unfortunately. So we have to make certain that we’re having those conversations, asking the

right questions of the person that’s coming in to have to get that help. So many people have been out things for so many months, so they’re like, please help me, you know, and we’re like, okay, but I can’t touch you.

Durand Carter:

And that’s part of what we do. And then as far as industry and onset just to address that I do some really cool things. Well actually, I don’t know if I came up with it or if it was something that I read, but I try to minimally go to location. If it is a set that is an established set then you want your table and your SMA, which is your cemetery maintenance area. That’s specific to you and in that, in that area, that’s away from whatever else that’s going on. So you have to keep the distance in your mind. One client at a time. I usually do something that I go the extra mile and I have this really awesome roll of saran wrap that I put down. So that way I’m not placing my tools on a place that I’ve not sanitized or am familiar with because I don’t know what’s been on that area before getting there.

Durand Carter:

So that basically coats it, or you have disposable tablecloths or plastics and that sort of thing, just to prep your area. Once you’ve gotten that established, then it’s utilizing the shield there’s gloves. You want to also find the comfortability with the client and know that you do it in two steps. It’s easier to do. I may ask on the client and work on eyes and then finish the look. They’re on the lips and area after if it’s a hair service, there’s steps in the process for that also usually the client is masked up until the point where you completed your look, looking, you can do your finished work and make sure that you’re protected. So once again, I can’t emphasize enough, it’s your protection as well as the client’s protection, especially if you’re in that space with them. And there are some guidelines that can really help you fine tune those things. If you need

Melissa Oretta:

Durand covered it, you were so thorough. I love it. And I’m going to steal your saran wrap idea instead of using, going from like potato chips and yeah. It is, it’s finding that comfortability with your client, it’s protecting them and it’s protecting you. And it’s been very interesting figuring out how to work a face mask, but like Duran said, putting a face mask on your client while you’re working on their eye area has been something that’s worked out really well. And then you just remove it, work around it and be very aware. You use a lot of hand sanitizer consistently all the time even over gloves. So I’ve been utilizing hand sanitizer. There is, I like DRAM said, get on there and definitely certified through the Barbicide program that they’ve got right now and get your certificate on COVID cleanliness, it’s easy and it’s fast. And it is something that really helps your clients feel confident that you’re going to take care of them in a safe manner as well.

Cris Michelle:

For sure. I agree. 100% again, I also like to kind of talk through This with the client, just so they feel that confidence as well. Okay. I see with the shield Durand, yes.

Durand Carter:
Running around with this thing in his favor.

Cris Michelle:

But I feel like it kind of gains their confidence with you as well when you’ve kind of walked them through and kind of like in front of them, like are sanitizing the things before it asked her used, you know, and it builds that confidence, not only with them, but in the room that, okay, this person got their bigger stuff together. You know, I can trust that what is going on my face is clean and safe.

Sarah Marince:
That was a serious saran wrap roll.

Durand Carter:

The best thing ever is that it’s the industry size saran wrap. The most wonderful thing about this is that I’m also, I do tattoo microblading and embrace shading. And so this is some of the techniques that we utilize in our training there. So you wrap your chairs with this, and this is perfect because you can wrap your station or just stretch it out. And it cleans right to any table surface, which is awesome. It also allows you to put it on your chair. If you’re using a salon chair or some leather fabrics, you just place a strip of this and it’s going to clean and doesn’t go anywhere. And so I think everyone should, it’s like my household. I’ll never leave home without it

Sarah Marince: That’s serious.

Durand Carter:

But it really does make a big difference. And and it’s a nice way. Here’s a really fun tip is that if you have your brushes laid out, if you’re using them, I try to use as much disposable stuff as possible, which way us professionals please factor that into your budgets because we have to kind of recalculate some things, but you can easily fold the saran wrap and it’ll protect your things from anything that’s airborne that may possibly land on it. So while you’re, you can open it up and get your things and not have to worry about like being in a specific box, kind of a really fun thing to do.

Sarah Marince:
What are some important things you need to know before you get on set?

Durand Carter:

I guess before going on set, you’ll usually get that production call or the call sheet beforehand. Make certain that you’re taking a look that ask all of the questions. There’s no question too big or too small or too strange to ask because that is going to better inform you

Sarah Marince:
What are the questions that you ask?

Durand Carter:

I, first of all, I, first and foremost, I always ask for headshots and are they time and travel to rate of pay. And then you can really decide if that’s the game you, if it’s for you. And, and, and then really what the expectation is because really, if you think about it, it’s great. We can do this, what we do, and most people can get there and nail the job. No problem. But it’s really, what is the expectation of the of the

company or the crew or the person that hired you? What did th what’s the end result and shoot for that? If you can get that, then, you know, it’s it’s one in the hand.

Melissa Oretta:

He nailed it. I think another thing though, is workflow kind of getting an idea along with expectation, is this a project where I’m going to be following talent? Is this a project where I’m going to be stationary? Things like that, just so you know, that you can set or rise to the standard that set on the booking that you’re working on. Chris.

Cris Michelle:
Honestly, I have nothing to add. Melissa and Duran, Got it.

Sarah Marince:
So once you’re onset, how long does it take to become camera ready?

Durand Carter:
Then you want to know how big is the head and how many sets of extensions are we putting in?

Durand Carter:

Yeah. and it, it really varies, you know, we’ve all had that hurry up and wait moment, which is great against that. I think those are like, when you really feel good that, you know, you you’ve gotten the job done and you can at least relax a bit, but it’s anywhere from after setup, which you want to be there beforehand to be properly set up in order to work effectively. And I always want to factor that in like, I need to get there unpack and breathe for me because you know, the talent I re Metro that they float in and then me come flying in and try to catch up because that doesn’t look professional. Not that I haven’t been there, but you know, it’s a different place now. And so if I’m prepared, it’s less time for me to have the big through the cat or readdress something or maybe some other talent shows up earlier than the other ones.

Durand Carter:

And you can start on them and just kind of keep the ball rolling because we have an ability to really help set the tone. And it’s so appreciated by everyone. Cause they see you doing your best, which is really cool. The other is, is that she has three hairs and you that are doing hair have to give her 34. So, and how many clip ins or how many instances or how many curling errands do we need in Boulevard and so forth? So it can be anywhere from 15 minutes to a full hour. I think an hour, I don’t know that we’ve ever gotten an hour, but you know, sometimes it depends on what the job is. I’ll leave some room for someone else’s like share, please share.

Melissa Oretta:

No, he’s totally right. I think it really depends. It depends on if you’re just making somebody camera ready for an interview or if you’re going full glam, if it’s a concept at there’s so

Melissa Oretta:

Many different things that the amount of time that it takes really does vary. But I do, I feel average is 15 minutes to an hour, hour and a half. If you’re doing hair and makeup and it’s more of an intense look, I

agree. I, 100% agree. I think it’s about what time they have. Like for instance, when I’m at Fox four and one of the anchors are popping in and I haven’t, and they didn’t get their makeup done before they initially went on set. It’s like, okay, we have three minutes, but to do it, you know? So in, in, in some cases it’s kind of like how much time do they have to work with. But I agree. I would definitely say 15 minutes to an hour. I can’t say I’ve ever hidden hour personally, but then again, it depends on the look and what they’re going for. So yes, I would, again, go with the answer,

Durand Carter:

Chris, I think you have the challenge if you’re at a state at a television station you’re you’re so right. I know that anchor or that person that comes in and they like have given you, they really are windblown. Is that what it mean?

Cris Michelle:

Yes. It’s kind of like, they have the thing in their ear and they’re like, Oh, I got, I have to go right now. I’m like, Oh wait, I’m calling them out of the makeup area with the powder. Like just waiting till the commercial comes back on so I can get in there and kind of finish everything, you know? So yes,

Durand Carter:

I look for that continuity when you like, see that first, they come on that first app and then after, after a commercial break, they come back and they look so done. You’re allowed, right?

Cris Michelle: Yeah.

Durand Carter:
Normal to watch TV with someone. What did you see that?

Cris Michelle:
Let’s rewind it. Let’s see. Okay. Okay. They look a little more awake right now. Yes.

Durand Carter:
Her weight was all sideways.

Durand Carter:

That’s the thing about talent and that’s, I think what’s really awesome about, you know, you can take those moments to like saber and go, okay, I got you. But don’t you really work for your money in those instances?

Sarah Marince:
So what are some common struggles that you face?

Durand Carter:

Hmm. Onset struggles. I don’t know that. I mean, probably because I’m, I’ve been in this and I enjoy it and I don’t look at them as struggles any longer, but I have to think back to the reality or the expectation

or the reality of the talent versus the need of the job. And, and, and I really cute example is someone that maybe has enjoyed themselves the night before. And the expectation is for fresh and still smells like it’s a 12 pack in a cigar two. And you’re like, okay, so we’re going to take all this, you know, there’s those things, I guess the reality is their challenge and, and it can be versus the expectation. And, and I, I wanna like kind of streamline this over to also something that’s a struggle, not just on set, but also in the beauty market is knowing your business. And when people come in with an expectation of wanting to look something far off from what their reality might be, because they’re influenced by social media filters the world at large. And how do you wrangle people into the reality of what we can do for them without our magic bonds and, you know so it’s kinda nice, but I think all of that starts with the conversation. And I don’t know, what are you guys is some of your real struggles?

Cris Michelle:

I would say I’ve worked on a music video shoot other than time, like at Fox four where I have like, literally just two minutes to work some magic, I would say I’ve worked in some spaces that didn’t have air conditioning. Oh gosh. So the struggle is just keeping sweat off of their face. And that’s like touching up like, like getting onset, being right there next to them, letting them do their thing and then like touching them up right away, you know, before the foundation and everything just smells off, you know? So that’s something that I would say. And I mean, in Texas, the fact that some places don’t have air conditioning should be like against the law, but it is what it is. And I mean, of course there’s always outside where things get shot as well. So I would say that would be a struggle. Just keeping them just glowing, even though it’s a million degrees,

Durand Carter: That’s real,

Melissa Oretta:

You know, I really think that they covered it. I think it just bridging the gap between what client or what talent wants and what actual clients and giving realistic expectations, letting them work with a brush, not a scalpel, you know, handle that situation. Make me look like Kim Kardashians. Let me pull up the picture of me. Talk about the elements of Kim’s look that you liked, that we could take quite often.

Cris Michelle:

Like, they’ll give you an inspiration picture and the person’s like a different color or the lip pigments, a little different and you kind of just have to like pull the essence of that look and say, Oh, so we want like a deep red, Oh, so we want like a PGI, you know what I mean? So you have to pull the essence of that and kind of see what it is. I gravitate them to that look to this picture other than, of course celebrity, because honey, I would love to look like Kimmy K you know, but it is what it is.

Durand Carter:
Who’s that I am going to say, you want the essence?

Melissa Oretta:

Well, it’s true inspiration. Right. But so many people come in and think, Oh, it’s going to be cookie cutter, no inspired by the essence look inspired by.

Durand Carter:

I have captured the essence of a Kim K.

Sarah Marince: I love that.

Durand Carter:
Just a few minutes. Sit tight. I mean, some of the proceeds, I can’t just capitalize on that alone.

Sarah Marince:

What are a few things that every beginner makeup artists should have in their kits? Like what are some of the tools that you absolutely should have when building your kit in the beginning?

Durand Carter:

I think the girls. Yeah. you guys mentioned it earlier. It’s the fundament, it’s the, it’s the fundamental basics. So your tools, foundation, a variety of foundations or foundations that are blendable, that if you know how to color, blend and mix a few things, you can take a small amount and make it bigger. You know, you can stretch it a bit. And safety tools anything from your nudes to your variety of color spectrums. I think that’s, yeah,

Cris Michelle:

I would agree with that. I would say like disposable. Oh, sorry, Melissa. [inaudible] I would say like a lot of the disposable things. Like if, for instance, if you went to counter, what disposable items do they have have that of course alcohol makeup, remover brush cleaner. Essentially when you’re doing your makeup, you want that in your kit, but a little bit more versatile for different skin tones. And I would also say having like in your back pocket is the knowledge of undertones of skin. So you’re able to color match within two seconds. Like you see somebody you’re like, okay, let’s get it. So that’s also what I would say,

Durand Carter:
Tons and tons of brushes.

Durand Carter:
This is it for those hot swampy days in Texas, honey,

Cris Michelle:
Come on over honey, come on over because it is a real hot one.

Durand Carter:

Oh my gosh. I actually, I can understand that. And I’ll share with you guys something that was really cause here in Fresno, it’s in California, it gets pretty hot too. It doesn’t go from zero to one 10, like it does in Texas. I’ve experienced that, but we sometimes get the humidity and I did this amazing person who was her wedding and we went to do photographs. It was beautiful. We were in an air condition control environment. And until we got to the park to do the photographs and they wanted the grass the night before all of the humidity came from beneath and I was drenched as well, was she? And we were trying to keep her dry. And I felt like just a hot mess because not only were her heels sinking, but so were my eyebrows. It was like, you’re about two feet, two inches into this soil. And I’m about Lawson

eyebrows. It’s over, let’s go to hard concrete. It was better than it was a little bit more dry. But yeah, there’s all these things that come in. So this is why I have all these things handy. You never know what you need to pull out at any time now you never know. Yeah. Fun experiences.

Sarah Marince:

So I’m going to switch to the business side of things because it can’t all be fun with doing the makeup. I guess there is a business side to everything. So how do you guys handle the business side of hair and makeup artistry?

Durand Carter:

I, how I handle it, I guess it would be a little bit something that I had to learn over a few years, and this is to basically know how to handle it as a business. So for myself, I have to look at it as in third person the same way that people hired me for a job. So I had to make Duran Carter, the makeup artist, a business, or a brand separate myself entirely look at what it took to make the business run. Because we were such passionate and intimate people in personal that I’m charging a rate to be influenced by, you know, Oh, I know her, or this is a really good friend’s cousin or what have you. And that sort of thing and wanting to give, we give so much for ourselves. And quite honestly, I think this is going to apply or translate over to the professional world when you’re hiring for whether it be a Sephora or a, a Macy’s or Nordstrom’s or whatever brands or sorts you work for know your words.

Durand Carter:

And by knowing your work is really separating yourself from what it is as a talent or as an artist, and know that you can go in and ask for what’s necessary in order to to run a business. So that’s those are things that are gosh, it’s setting up the proper rates. It’s paying your business, paying your business means paying for your travel. It means paying for your time to set aside the time in order to do the job. It also is also how does that, what percentage of that goes into building the brand? The advertisement that we know that the world of social media sucks time, that you’ll never get back. And how does it, how much time does it take me to sit down and to create an ad campaign on social media? If I’m like sucked into the rabbit hole for a couple of hours, that’s time that I should be paid as a artist, that’s doing that for my brand.

Durand Carter:

And we view don’t cut your talents short and what it is that you bring to the business, because if you were to step away from that and you were to think of that, you have hired someone for all of those various different roles, those persons would have to get paid for those roles. So really add that to your calculation and be Montessori, but understandable with yourself. No, it’s okay to ask for that amount travel time. The time that’s invested in to building the brand and, and whatever the rate is it also will help eliminate a lot of in the long run. It will help eliminate the clients that you don’t want because that’s knowing your worth. And when you’re able to speak to that, it’s a really big separation. And I think a lot of people struggle from it especially because we just want to create, and that’s our, our, our beautiful talent, that’s the gym that we have within, but that gym is very valuable.

Durand Carter:

So you have to kind of know what to ask for. Something that I can elaborate a little bit on is that some of the brand lines, now they charge 50 bucks. Well, don’t cut yourself short because the neighbor girl is charging $50 versus you charging $250. You may not want that client because she’s going to come in and

say that she wants something that’s unrealistic of your niche and of what you’re offering or what your worth is and what your value and when you’re giving. So like, there’s just so many gases, but look at it as a business start building the brand early and, and really capturing that because it’ll make such a difference. If you can look at it as a separate entity, then your personal energy entity that you put into it,

Sarah Marince:
That is all very, very great advice. Melissa, do you have anything to add to that?

Melissa Oretta:

No, I think Durand’s, you’re just killing it. I think making sure that you allot every piece of time that you spend on your business is an investment. And so it, it’s, it’s so important that you do factor that in when you’re sending your rates and that you do stick to that. I’m a person that’s emotionally charged and all day long. If I know you, I would give you a discount here or here, but up here, you do, you’ve got to draw a line and it does it, it ends up attracting the clientele that you want to work with, which is ideally your end goal.

Cris Michelle:

I definitely agree. I think the business aspect is always a struggle for creatives, because like I mentioned before, like when I am, you know, doing makeup, I feel like I’m at complete peace. Like this is my purpose in life. Like, I just feel like I’m glowing from within. And then the fact that I get paid for it is just like the cherry on top, but it

Cris Michelle:
It’s something that I have struggled with.

Cris Michelle:

But like Duran said, definitely know your words. And think of it, like if someone would go to target and buy something, they wouldn’t sit there and like negotiate and say, can I get it for this? Can I get no, you know, so the same thing with you, obviously we are not target honey, but still, you definitely want to hold onto that worse that you, that you bring to the table. And again, like Joanne said, we, we are gems, you know, and definitely that should be the highlight a little pin there.

Durand Carter:

I think if I might say, I said this earlier, and then not to just repeat myself, but I have been sharing this and if this is one of Durand’s tips or if I found it somewhere else, Hey, it’s been the best thing to share with people, especially persons that are new into the industry, or even some of us struggling. It doesn’t have to be the starving artist. And some of us look at people that are, or other artists that we know in the industry that have created an entire wealth system for themselves by granting. And that doesn’t matter the value of your education, your certificates, your, your timestamp in the industry. So the suddenly this artist has come from who knows where off of YouTube or Instagram or tick talk and suddenly they’re making millions. And we’re like, what, how do they do that?

Durand Carter:

That’s the best question to ask is how did they do that? And how do I do that if that’s what you want? Because you know, being a beauty artist, just maybe what you want, but if you want bigger aspirations

or bigger dreams than look at it as a business, because that tick tock is a business and they found those little things to set it up and form a, a brand, we are a brand, whatever your name is or whatever your handle is, is your brand stand true to that? The slight separation of personality versus the being of the brand or the entity of the brand is been the most helpful thing for myself, because I can look at it like a crazy person, that third person or whatever you want to, but I can look at it and say, the brand needs to, you know, or I have to, you know, it’s got to get to this location. The brand has got to get to spend this much time. The brand has to not want Duran. I’d give my straight up my back. If it wasn’t the one that wanted anymore, but I, we give so much, so you really want to be able to like, say, this is what it is. And it really removes you from that. Yeah.

Sarah Marince:
Fun question. Favorite or the best on-camera foundation in setting powder two products.

Durand Carter:
Oh my gosh. I’ll let someone else go first.

Melissa Oretta:
And for what purpose, there’s so many things?

Cris Michelle:

Will we gain a Sponsorship by saying a certain brand? I would have to say makeup forever. HD foundation is really, really, really beautiful. It’s lightweight. It’s still full coverage and it’s so diverse. It’s that’s my little baby. That’s my go to.

Durand Carter:
Danny’s the creative makeup forever is going to love you.

Durand Carter:

Yeah. for me, I, I have well makeup and setting some of my makeup doesn’t always need to be set, which is kind of cool. However, I am very partial to the Chanel brand. I’ve been working with it for awhile and I love the advances in what it offers. It’s just beautiful. So I do use that. I have some makeup forever too, but yeah.

Melissa Oretta:
Mercy has got a great translucent powder that I feel like is really versatile. Yeah. Love it.

Sarah Marince: Love it. Universal.

Melissa Oretta:
Yeah. So universal. It works for anybody kind of works for any situation.

Cris Michelle:
There’s so many different things. You can have a matte lip right there with the powder.

Sarah Marince:

One more fun question. What’s one product you can’t live without like you personally can’t live without, beauty wise?

Melissa Oretta:
Bye bye. Under eye concealer, I got three kids. Yes.

Durand Carter:
I have to say, It’s probably going to be concealer concealer. I just

Cris Michelle:

I’m going to go with like a light CC or BB cream, because without makeup, I have like some redness on my face. And so just having like a little just when, when color, you know so I would say, I would say nice little light CC, BB cream. Have you played with our glasses? Hyleronic little [inaudible] yeah. A little bit more luminosity to it. Just play with it next time you cruise. Yeah. Yeah, yeah. I’m going to try it. I’m going to try it.

Durand Carter:

I’m going to plug this one too. So the corrector de Chanel. It’s just like, it does things for you, right? Sunblock forever sunblock. Yeah. Yeah.

Sarah Marince:

So we have a question from Doug Morris. Hi, Doug. We’re glad you’re here with us today. As a TV art director, I often find that a successful makeup artist not only provides makeup skills, but could often provide the actor with confidence in their appearance. What specific techniques can you apply to have the talent feel relaxed in their role or character?

Durand Carter:

That’s a really good question. And that for me which is one of the things being there and being present and making the connection in order to it, it’s really, it’s just, it’s the best thing being present in the moment in Malibu and not making it about me, but understanding that I’m there to serve that talent or to serve that job. It’s I just like to be open and just kind of help out, like how can I help someone else feel better today type of situation. Yeah, for sure.

Cris Michelle:

I think, I think as makeup artists were also kind of like therapists, if that makes sense. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard so many different stories and I’m just providing, you know, whatever advice I have or whatever 2 cents I have on it. And it just like really just releases that for them, you know? And at box for like whenever we have guests, I definitely like to talk to them like, Oh, so what are we going to talk about today? What questions do you have? Can I get you water or coffee? You know, just whatever we’ll kind of just like, bring them that competence and kind of like get them right before they get on air, like all their ideas and thoughts and what they want to talk about right there. So that’s what I would, I would say, we’re just therapists, like I’m here for you.

Melissa Oretta:

It’s true. It’s about talking to them. I mean, really at the end of it just never have that awkward silence in your chair, unless you’ve read the situation and instinct necessary, but talking to them, connecting with them, making them feel comfortable when they’re with you is going to take a lot of tension off. So by the time it’s time for them to go and turn it on and whatever they’re doing, they’re able to do that. They’re in that right. Mind space for it. Excellent. So one last question here, unless we have anybody else who wants to pop into our chat box

Sarah Marince:

How can clients find you for your job? You can plug your socials here, if you want your website. Well, what’s the best way for people to find you?

Durand Carter:

I’m booked through Durand Carter. My IG handle is @DuranCarterMUA on Instagram. I am also a YouTube person. I don’t know, better to do just Instagram, DM me, or call me direct.

Cris Michelle:

So I’m my Instagram handle is @makeupby_crismichelle. You DM me, there’s also a book, a little book, but in that you can click and book with me as well.

Melissa Oretta:

Awesome. you can go to our website, www.Alldolleduphairandmakeup.com It is a mouthful. I actually have a team of 23 hairstylists and makeup artists that specialize in print and film and really anything photo related. So we’re lucky we’ve got a really cool diverse team. I’m the girl on the other end of the keyboard. So you can say, Hey Melissa, do you want me to specifically, but yeah, hop over to our website or our bridal Instagram is @alldolledup_norCal . Our social media manager makes us stay very much within the bridal realm there because she believes in keeping things diverse or living in their own little bubbles. But you can DMS there too.

Sarah Marince:

I did check out your website. It is adorable. It is so well, thank you three so much for coming and talking with everyone this evening. I learned a lot as I’m sure everyone else did. And thank you for sharing your knowledge and all of your tips. If the huge roll of saran wrap that we can go out and buy. And thank you everyone for joining us and listening. I hope you have a wonderful rest of your Wednesday and a wonderful rest of your week. I’m Sarah Marince at SarahMarince.com and I will see you next time. Bye everyone.

 

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